Manchester: Manchester Cathedral

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I can’t quite believe I’ve never visited Manchester Cathedral before, given the number of times I’ve walked past this building and never even given it a thought to even take a look inside. Isn’t it ironic how little attention we pay to things and places that have always existed in our own cities or towns?

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Manchester Cathedral is in the heart of the city and has been one of its main attractions for more than 600 years. There was a new calling for a new collegiate church to be built, so in 1421 it was Henry V who signed a royal charter for permission for the rebuild, and then in 1847 a new Manchester diocese was created and this church became a cathedral.

One day, as I went for a walk around the city, I decided to visit the inside of Manchester Cathedral.

I was surprised as I entered because I hadn’t quite imagined it would be as big as it was from the outside. It’s actually a really beautiful cathedral, and the interior is a great example of mediaeval carved woodwork in the North of England; the stained glass is more modern as the church suffered damage in World War II. It also had more renovations after it was damaged in the 1996 IRA bombing.

It’s a great place for anyone who enjoys architecture and would like to learn more history about our vibrant little city.

Unfortunately, I didn’t take many photos as my battery was running low. Maybe I’ll visit again and post a few more.

If your visiting Manchester City Centre, do take a look inside. You can find the cathedral at Victoria St., Manchester M3 1SX.

Thanks for stopping by to take a look at our cities’ little cathedral. Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Hollingworth Lake County Park

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Hollingworth Lake is situated in Littleborough, Greater Manchester, England.

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A bit about the history of Hollingworth Lake

The lake was first constructed to serve as the primary water source for Rochdale Canal, but in the 1860s it turned into a well- liked tourist destination.

Early in the 20th century, it started to lose popularity as a tourist attraction and was used as a training camp for the second World War.

Following World War II, Rochdale Council acquired the reservoir and boating rights and designated the surrounding areas as a country park in 1974, giving rise to the name Hollingworth Lake and Country Park, which is now a popular tourist destination once again.

I can’t believe I didn’t visit this location until earlier this year. It is one of the most beautiful places to grab a moment’s peace and quiet and another great find on the outskirts of my city.

I’d say this is a great place for those living or staying in Manchester seeking tranquility, and it’s only a 40-minute drive away from the city centre

Additional information

There are plenty of facilities here, including its very own caravan park. Take a look here to find out more and make the most of your day trip here.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Portland Basin Museum

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Portland Basin Museum is located in a nineteenth-century warehouse in Ashton-under-Lyne in Greater Manchester near a beautiful canal side.

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I visited here with my mum in 2020, just before the first COVID-19 national lockdown for England, hence us wearing our face masks in the photos.

Since I’m blogging more about locations in and around my city, I recently discovered the images on my old phone and decided that this museum deserved a worthy spot for Manchester my blog.

Stepping back into the 1920s

The museum has exhibitions where you can experience what life was like back in the 1920s in Tameside.

The 1920s street

We had a great time exploring the street of the 1920s.

My mum, who educated me with her own knowledge and recollections, made the trip much more informative and enjoyable.

My mum, who is in her sixties, was able to tell me about several things that were still in use in the 1950s and 1960s. I loved hearing about all her memories and stories as she recalled them from each of the items.

It was lovely to see how her expression changed when she came across items that brought back her memories. She was wearing a mask, so I couldn’t see her face, but I could see that her eyes were sparkling.

Exploring the industrial heritage and farm

We had the opportunity to learn about the region’s historical industrial heritage and what it was like to work in the mines by hearing personal accounts from those who had done so.

Life on the farm

There is also a part where you may read in detail about the early days of the local farming. 

We thought this was very intriguing.

Additional information

There is much more to do and learn about here in addition to what has already been covered, but I want to make this post as brief as possible.

The portland basin Museum, in my opinion, is a great place for visitors of all ages and has a lot to offer.

Admission:

Admission is free and the museum it’s usual opening hours are 10am to 4pm accept on Monday when it is closed.

Click here to find out more information if you plan to visit.

Hope you have enjoyed my blog today

Thanks for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Dovestone Reservoir

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One of my favourite places to recommend when visiting Manchester is Dovestone Reservoir. This beautiful piece of paradise is located on the edge of Oldham above the village of Greenfield, on Saddleworth Moor in Greater Manchester, and is at the edge of the Peak District.

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It is one of the most spectacular beauty spots near Manchester and is a popular place for walkers, hikers, runners and perfect for a family day out.

To be transparent here, there are a number of reservoirs. I am unsure of just how many and have only visited three times. With this being said, I can’t be too precise, therefore. I will only speak of the locations I visited. I still have a lot yet to discover here.

Main reservoir and surrounding areas

Down at the bottom is the main reservoir and plenty of beauty spots to have a picnic. If you don’t fancy walking around these spots alone, make it a worthwhile visit.

The main reservoir

Yeoman Hey Reservoir

Yeoman Hey Reservoir circular walk is a steady, level, nice walk that is great for people of all ages, and anyone with a wheelchair or pram. The route offers scenic views of several reservoirs and stunning landscapes.

Just beyond Yeoman Hey there are parts that are a little rugged and a slightly inclined surface. However, the path remains.

You’ll start to come to some stunning overlooking views, as if you have had quite a hike when you really haven’t.

More advanced route for hikers

Chew Valley and Reservoir

Chew Valley can be reached through Dovestone Reservoir Car Park, walking by Dovestone Reservoir and the adjacent woodland, then taking the path route to the right. The climb will start from here.

The climb up is quite a challenging one, but the foot path makes it more manageable.

You will truly feel at one with nature surrounded by all the mountain landscapes.

Just before the reservoir, you will reach Chew Valley and its incredible beauty.

Chew Valley reservoir is one of the most beautiful and peaceful places. The reservoir is in an elevated position and sits 1,600 feet above sea level with views of the moorlands and hills.

Useful information

Getting here

I will use Manchester City centre as the starting point

By Car: It’s around a 45 to 50 minute drive depending on traffic. There are two car parks which pay and display and cost £4 for the day. As with many places, you will have to arrive early to get a place. Other than this, there are plenty of street parking in the surrounding areas.

By Bus: Get the train to Greenfield Station, than the 350 bus from Greenfield Station to Dovestones. This route will take just over one hour and 30 minutes.

Another option is to take a bus, either the 84 or the 83 from Oldham Street in Piccadilly. Take the bus to Oldham Town Centre, then take the 350 bus to Dovestones. This journey will take around two hours (buy a day saver for £5.50).

Facilities

There are toilets here including a disability toilet (RADAR key required)

There are no shops here, although there is usually an Ice cream van located in the Dovestone car park.

There is also a sailing club

I hope you have enjoyed my blog today.

Thank you for visiting today

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤