Part 2 Hilbre Islands: A Uninhabited Island Near Liverpool

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After my dramatic failed attempt of reaching this Island, I can happily announce I successfully made it over two weeks later.

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It was a glorious sunny week and about to get even warmer as we approached the weekend. I figured if it was sunny there would be a fair chance of other people taking walks out to Hilbre Islands, so I booked my trains for the very next day.

I was absolutely right! I arrived at West Kirby beach at 10.45am as the tide was coming in much later than last time. I was confident, very well equipped and a lot more organised than last time. Nothing whatsoever was going to stop me. Walking out to sea, I could see other people walking out and I could also see the coast guard’s vehicle sitting on Little Eye Island as I approached. It felt much safer than last time.

I had already experienced Little Eye, so didn’t stop here and headed straight over to Middle Eye.

Middle Eye

Middle Eye is a small Uninhabited tidal island located to the South of Hilbre Island.

Over on this Island there are interesting rock strata, caves and seasonal flowers. Many rock pools to explore with lots of crabs, shrimps and tiny fish to find hiding in the shadows.

The rock formations and the views from this island are just surreal.

….And I finally made it to Hilbre Island!

At last, I finally made it to Hilbre Island after weeks of hesitation, fear of crossing because of the lack of being unable to swim and one failed attempt. Don’t you just love it when you conquer something you were so fearful of? This felt like a victory for me. 😂

What’s on the Island, things to see and facilities

Houses

There are a few cute houses here, however as I have mentioned I’m my last blog. Nobody has lived here permanently since 2012. However, some of the houses are privately owned.

The last person to live here permanently was a Wirral Council Warden, but since January 2012 it was announced there will be no permanent residents here. This was after the Wirral Council struggled to find a ranger willing to live without electricity or water supply. The rangers now visit on a daily basis.

Could you live here without energy or water supplies?

The Hilbre Bird Observatory

One of the most interesting buildings here is the bird observatory. This is where birds are monitored for the recordings of a national network of observatories. And as a place of nature reserve, you bet you will spot some of the more unique birds.

The Old life boat station and slip way

The old life boat station was built in 1839 and remained in service until 1939 after being abandoned.

It was built here along with a long slipway so the life boats could be used even if the tide was low. But it was abandoned for the tractor that towed the boats across instead.

Enjoy the panoramic views

Enjoy the panoramic views where you can look out to The River Dee Estuary, the mountains of North Wales and the Wirral Coast line.

The views here are breathtaking! You’ll be glad you took the walk out.

Spot the grey Seals

The island has a colony of grey seals. Apparently the best place to spot then is behind the old life boat station. I didn’t know this until I had left the island and unfortunately didn’t get to see any.

Bird watching

The island is a prime spot for bird watching. There is an array of different birds all throughout the year. They fall into four groups estuary birds, sea birds, migrating birds and breeding birds.

Facilities

There is a little seating area with a shelter on the island as well as two toilets

If you would like to know more advice and tips on visiting the island stay tuned for my next up and coming post.

Thank you for visiting my blog today

Stay blessed ❤🙏🏾

Hilbre Islands Part1: A beautiful Uninhabited Island near Liverpool

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Travelling to Liverpool? You may want to take an adventure over to these cool islands located between England and Wales.

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, meaning, I get a commission if you decide to make a purchase through my links, at no cost to you. Please read my Disclosure page for more info

The Hilbre Islands are an archipelago made up of three Islands: Little Eye, Middle Eye and the largest of the three, Hilbre. They are located at the edge of the estuary of the River Dee, at the border of England and Wales. The Islands can be reached by foot during low tide from West Kirby on the Wirral peninsula, Merseyside and can take anywhere between around 50 – mins to an hour and a half to get to all three, depending on your own pace.

Once you arrive, it offers amazing photo opportunities of beautiful beach houses, panoramic sea views, and wildlife. If your lucky you may even spot some grey Seals!

Most Challenging trip of my year so far

This adventure has been my favourite adventure so far this year, but it has been my most challenging of the year so far.

I first made the discovery of the Islands back in February. I was super excited so couldn’t wait to do the adventure. Although, I hesitated for around two weeks before booking the trip.

The thought of crossing over was causing me to feel a little nervous. I kept reading about how the tide comes in so quickly and about people who had to be rescued after getting caught in the tide. Also, I was a little confused about the safest times to cross over. I understood it to have a safe journey. You must cross 3 hours after high tide and be back on the mainland at least 3 hours before the tide comes in. The times of low and high tide are stated clearly on the few websites I visited, but the times stated for low and high tide were always six hours apart, which didn’t make sense. Therefore, I wasn’t sure if these were the times I should head out and come back, or wait three hours after the times shown 🤔. I eventually found some really helpful websites that put my mind at ease ,which I’m so grateful I did as the ones shown on the beach were confusing. ( I will share these websites along with other advice and information in a later blog)

It was a little frightening

I eventually booked the trip in the first week of March. I arrived at the beach around 8.45am and started to walk out, but got cold feet when realising no one else was walking out to sea. I headed back and asked a kind man with a dog if I was heading in the right direction. Looking quite worried about my wellbeing, he said “Yes, but have you checked the tide times? Be careful the tide comes in quickly”. His reaction made me want to check to see if a coastal guard was around, but there didn’t seem to be any around. I spotted a lady working near by the lake, so asked her if it was a good time to walk out. She, like the man earlier, had the same reaction. She explained to go immediately, but to not hang around for too long once there. She also told me the safest way to reach all the islands. Well, I am definitely a lot more nervous now. Regardless, I started to head out there.

The further out I got, the more my fears grew to the point of wanting to turn back. It was an incredibly frightening experience for someone who can not swim. 🤣 Nonetheless, I would not allow myself to turn back with the promise to myself of being allowed to turn back after reaching the first tiny little island.

I had tortured myself enough, Therefore, I didn’t want to force myself to reach the other two. Well, not this day anyway, but definitely next time.

Once there, I felt better, but still didn’t feel brave enough to attempt the other two Islands. However, was really proud of myself for facing this challenge.

On Little Eye are the remains of a brick and concrete moorings a long with a substantial iron bolt remaining in place. The island is mostly made up of red bunter sandstone and grass.

I must admit it felt great heading back to the mainland having not been swept out to sea 🤣.

My return journey was much more successful. I will share that in the next blog.

Thanks for reading

Stay blessed 🙏🏾❤