Manchester: Fletcher Moss Park and Parsonage gardens

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Hello to everybody!

I hope that everyone is off to a good start in the new year.

On the second day of the year, I spent a day in the Fletcher Moss botanical gardens to kick off my new year.

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Since it was a Sunday service on public transportation and there were more train strikes, I chose to go there because it seemed like a good choice that was not too far from home.

This prompts me to remark that, except for enjoying and living in the present, I haven’t set goals for this year. Aside from that, I want to start driving again this year because strikes and cancellations on public transportation have been making it difficult for me to get to some places. Do you have any new goals for this year? 

Fletcher Moss Parsonage and Gardens

Fletcher Moss Parsonage and Gardens is located in Didsbury, Manchester, and is one of the city’s best-lived green spaces.

Fletcher Moss Park was named after Fletcher Moss, an alderman who gifted his house, known as the parsonage, along with its gardens to the city of Manchester Council but continued to live there until his death in 1919.

The Parsonage is the second-oldest building in Didsbury, dating from around 1650. The house was used by the city council for many years but has since become a community centre with the help of lottery funding.

What to see here

There are separate areas here to see that are all linked in with the same park, so as well as the parsonage and gardens, there is also the Fletcher Moss Park and botanical garden, the nature reserve of Stenner Woods, Millgate Fields, and the River Mersey.

The botanical garden

The botanical garden is a gorgeous, tranquil sanctuary that is changeable with the weather, but no matter what time of the year you visit, it is always beautiful with so many beautiful plants. rock features and mini waterfalls palm trees, and a floating pond.

I’ve been here twice now, once in the spring and once in the winter, and both times were equally beautiful.

Stenner Woods and nature reserve

The wooded area isn’t particularly large, but it is a perfect place to get lost in nature. There are wetlands here, but there is also a wooden boardwalk to avoid getting your feet wet. There are also fallen trees that have been left there deliberately by the wardens, which just add to the natural environment. I couldn’t help but think how adventurous this would be for children as I walked around. I also saw little love hearts with pictures on them; I think these had been part of the Christmas trail, which I really enjoyed spotting.

There are a variety of species of birds that flock here all through the year; these include wrens, robins, blackbirds, thrushes, treecreepers, Sand Martins, blackcaps, and many more.

Millgate fields and River Mersey

There are also the millgate fields and the River Mersey, which make for a nice scenic walk along with other areas such as Withington, Charlton, and Northernden.

So if your in Manchester and fancy getting any from the city for a little while, I’d say this would be a great choice, and what’s more is that this place is right next to Didsbury Village, which is lined with numerous shops, cafes, and restaurants, which is perfect for grabbing a coffee or a bite to eat after your visit to Fletcher Moss Park.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today.

Thanks for visiting 

Stay blessed ðŸ™ðŸ¾

Natalie â¤ï¸

Manchester: Manchester Cathedral

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I can’t quite believe I’ve never visited Manchester Cathedral before, given the number of times I’ve walked past this building and never even given it a thought to even take a look inside. Isn’t it ironic how little attention we pay to things and places that have always existed in our own cities or towns?

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Manchester Cathedral is in the heart of the city and has been one of its main attractions for more than 600 years. There was a new calling for a new collegiate church to be built, so in 1421 it was Henry V who signed a royal charter for permission for the rebuild, and then in 1847 a new Manchester diocese was created and this church became a cathedral.

One day, as I went for a walk around the city, I decided to visit the inside of Manchester Cathedral.

I was surprised as I entered because I hadn’t quite imagined it would be as big as it was from the outside. It’s actually a really beautiful cathedral, and the interior is a great example of mediaeval carved woodwork in the North of England; the stained glass is more modern as the church suffered damage in World War II. It also had more renovations after it was damaged in the 1996 IRA bombing.

It’s a great place for anyone who enjoys architecture and would like to learn more history about our vibrant little city.

Unfortunately, I didn’t take many photos as my battery was running low. Maybe I’ll visit again and post a few more.

If your visiting Manchester City Centre, do take a look inside. You can find the cathedral at Victoria St., Manchester M3 1SX.

Thanks for stopping by to take a look at our cities’ little cathedral. Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Dunham Massey

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My trip to Dunham Massey was my first national trust trip since becoming a member. I visited here at the beginning of autumn in October. If there was ever a perfect autumn day, this would have closely matched it for me.

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What is Dunham Massey and where is it?

Dunham Massey is a Georgian house, garden and an ancient deer park full of treasures and stories. It is situated in Altrincham, Cheshire, Greater Manchester, and is regarded as one of the best attractions in this region for history and nature lovers.

A bit about the history

The house was home to two historic families, the Booth’s and the Grey’s, and holds over 400 years of history, wealth, and some rather scandalous stories.

The present house was built in 1616 by Sir George Booth but has since been altered and remodelled over the years 1732, 1740, 1905, and 1908.

The rising of the estate

The house really rose after George Booth, the 2nd Earl of Warrington, inherited the Dunham estate from his father, Henry Booth, the 1st Earl of Warrington, along with a debt of £50,000. As a way to clear the debt, he planted hundreds of trees as a source of timber. However, he finally manages to pay off that debt when he marries Mary Oldbury, who came with a huge dowry of £24,000, which is around £2.5 million today.

The house was inherited by their only child, Mary Booth, who married Harry Grey, the 4th Earl of Stamford, which meant the Durham Estate was brought into the Earldom of Stamford and into the Grey family.

The estate stays in the Grey family until 1976, when the last Earl, the 10th Earl of Stamford Roger Grey, who inherited the estate at just 13 years old dies, leaving the estate to the National Trust. It is the biggest gift left to the National Trust to date.

Fake memories, an eerie spooky walk, and reindeer spotting.

I was absolutely certain I’d been here once before, on a school trip at around the age of seven. I remember the trip clearly as a day, but strangely, upon arrival and all throughout the day, there was absolutely nothing recognisable. I am still unsure if I have been here before. Perhaps it could be another one of my fake childhood memories. Nonetheless, the first thing I planned to do was visit the medieval deer park, which was first mentioned in 1362.

The park is of scientific interest as it has hundreds of ancient trees and there have been roaming deer here for almost 1000 years.

Walking through the spooky deer park

The more I moved into the park, which appeared to be more like an extremely eerie forest, the spookier it became, especially when I arrived at a creepy looking small house. I’m glad I was unaware at the time because this house is reportedly haunted. Nonetheless, I still stopped for photos, as you can see.

There wasn’t a single soul around. It gave me the impression that I was staring in a scary movie as the stupid one who goes walking alone. 

Although I actually wanted to turn around at this point, I was determined to see the deer, so I kept on going.

Finally, I spotted a herd of deer in the distance. I wanted to take a closer look because, believe it or not, I’ve never actually seen a deer, at least not up close. But as I got closer, they seemed to have all vanished. Then, all of a sudden, I turned around, and there was this huge male Buck staring at me. Then I saw a huge herd of them, and from this point on, they all seemed to appear out of nowhere.

I was so delighted to see them, especially since I was told there was a possibility I wouldn’t due to the weather.

 

With c. 3000 acres of land here, there is plenty of ground to walk on and lots of outside buildings to discover.

Dunham Massey Watermill

The mill is a 17th-century corn mill that was later transformed into a saw mill in 1860. Sadly, after technology evolved and the mill became more expensive to run, it stopped working in the 1930s. It was later given to the National Trust in 1950.

There are tours available here to learn more about the mill and its history, but I didn’t attend these.

The historic stables

The stables at Dunham Massey were completed in the 18th century and have remained completely unchanged.

They were built to house around 25 animals, including race goats, ponies, cows, and carriages.

I had such a blissful time exploring the grounds that I hadn’t noticed that almost two and a half hours had passed by and I’d still not been to the main house.

I visited inside the house,but unfortunately unable to share photos

I eventually go inside the main house, but unfortunately, I cannot share any pictures because, although visitors are allowed to take photographs with no flash, they are not permitted to be shared inside some of the National Trust properties.

What it was like inside the house

I can tell you that this is a great house to visit. It takes you right back in time, and you can almost feel the atmosphere and the stories as you walk around.

I found it to be quite an eerie place, although that could have had something to do with my visiting on a quiet Tuesday morning and being in most of the rooms alone. Of course, there was staff on every floor, but obviously not in every room.

In some sections of the house, like the servants’ quarters, there are staff members dressed in traditional clothing like what the staff would have worn back in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. I particularly liked the butler; he was really funny and filled my head with imagination by telling me stories of how the house was run.

Overall, it was a really lovely experience, and every member of staff here is super friendly and helpful.

If you would like more information about Dunham Massey, visit here.

I hope you enjoyed the blog today.

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

 

Greater Manchester: Hollingworth Lake County Park

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Hollingworth Lake is situated in Littleborough, Greater Manchester, England.

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A bit about the history of Hollingworth Lake

The lake was first constructed to serve as the primary water source for Rochdale Canal, but in the 1860s it turned into a well- liked tourist destination.

Early in the 20th century, it started to lose popularity as a tourist attraction and was used as a training camp for the second World War.

Following World War II, Rochdale Council acquired the reservoir and boating rights and designated the surrounding areas as a country park in 1974, giving rise to the name Hollingworth Lake and Country Park, which is now a popular tourist destination once again.

I can’t believe I didn’t visit this location until earlier this year. It is one of the most beautiful places to grab a moment’s peace and quiet and another great find on the outskirts of my city.

I’d say this is a great place for those living or staying in Manchester seeking tranquility, and it’s only a 40-minute drive away from the city centre

Additional information

There are plenty of facilities here, including its very own caravan park. Take a look here to find out more and make the most of your day trip here.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Portland Basin Museum

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Portland Basin Museum is located in a nineteenth-century warehouse in Ashton-under-Lyne in Greater Manchester near a beautiful canal side.

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I visited here with my mum in 2020, just before the first COVID-19 national lockdown for England, hence us wearing our face masks in the photos.

Since I’m blogging more about locations in and around my city, I recently discovered the images on my old phone and decided that this museum deserved a worthy spot for Manchester my blog.

Stepping back into the 1920s

The museum has exhibitions where you can experience what life was like back in the 1920s in Tameside.

The 1920s street

We had a great time exploring the street of the 1920s.

My mum, who educated me with her own knowledge and recollections, made the trip much more informative and enjoyable.

My mum, who is in her sixties, was able to tell me about several things that were still in use in the 1950s and 1960s. I loved hearing about all her memories and stories as she recalled them from each of the items.

It was lovely to see how her expression changed when she came across items that brought back her memories. She was wearing a mask, so I couldn’t see her face, but I could see that her eyes were sparkling.

Exploring the industrial heritage and farm

We had the opportunity to learn about the region’s historical industrial heritage and what it was like to work in the mines by hearing personal accounts from those who had done so.

Life on the farm

There is also a part where you may read in detail about the early days of the local farming. 

We thought this was very intriguing.

Additional information

There is much more to do and learn about here in addition to what has already been covered, but I want to make this post as brief as possible.

The portland basin Museum, in my opinion, is a great place for visitors of all ages and has a lot to offer.

Admission:

Admission is free and the museum it’s usual opening hours are 10am to 4pm accept on Monday when it is closed.

Click here to find out more information if you plan to visit.

Hope you have enjoyed my blog today

Thanks for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester:The beautiful Dovestones

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You may recall that I wrote about Dovestone Reservoir earlier this year.

Since I didn’t have many pictures to offer in the other blog, I thought I’d share more pictures on how breathtakingly gorgeous this place is now that I’ve been on numerous occasions.

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I’m constantly in awe of this place because there are so many various circular pathways, and every time I come here, I discover something new.

One of the greatest attractions, the trinniacle (a stack of rock formations), has eluded me up until now; however, my sister and her husband recently found it, and my sister has promised to accompany me there, which I’m super excited about. Additionally, there are a few locations I have yet to visit that I have found on Instagram.

There are magical hidden waterfalls everywhere, and it’s like the gift that just keeps giving.

Also, I finally hiked right up to the top of Chew Valley. It was the first time on top, and I walked across the moorland there. The views of Dovestone Reservoir were stunning. 

If you want to learn more about the history of Dovestones, click here. Thinking about visiting? You can check out my last blog, where you can find details of how to get here.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Saddleworth, a place of rolling moorlands and stone villages.

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Since I featured Dovestone, it is only right I give Saddleworth a worthy mention. Especially as part of Dovestones sits on Saddleworth Moors. Not only this, but I believe Saddleworth to be a great example of the English countryside, a place where many tourists visit each year and people like myself come to escape city life.

If your planning a trip to Dovestones, you may want to visit some of the pretty villages in Saddleworth.

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Location

Saddleworth is a civil parish in Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is made up of several villages, hamlets and consists of suburbs in parts of the Pennine Hills which are part of Oldham. I’ve only visited two of the villages up to now, Delph Village and Uppermill Village. I’m still yet to return to visit the others.

Delph Village

Delph is a beautiful village to visit, particularly because the centre of it has hardly changed since the 19th century. It mostly looks the same as it did when it was occupied with textile Mills offering employment to the local community.

It’s name came from an old English word Delf, which means quarry.

Delph is such a beautiful place to take a stroll and breathe in the English Countryside.

I particularly liked the canal trail and seeing all the cute houses.

Uppermill Village

Just a 6 minute drive away, a half an hour walk or an 10 minute bus journey away from Delph Village is Uppermill Village.

Uppermill is one of the most popular stops for visitors. It is one of the most picturesque locations on this side of the moorland, and has has several independent craft shops, restaurants and cafés.

Like Delph and many of these other villages/towns, it was once occupied by the Romans. The Industrial Revolution made the most impact on these villages and towns in this area, with the building of the textile mills. You can learn more about this at the local Saddleworth Museum here.

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to photograph Uppermill much because the phone I was using dropped and broke, but if you are in the area do visit this beautiful village.

For more information on things to do and see in Uppermill visit here

Thank you for visiting today

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤

Greater Manchester: Dovestone Reservoir

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One of my favourite places to recommend when visiting Manchester is Dovestone Reservoir. This beautiful piece of paradise is located on the edge of Oldham above the village of Greenfield, on Saddleworth Moor in Greater Manchester, and is at the edge of the Peak District.

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It is one of the most spectacular beauty spots near Manchester and is a popular place for walkers, hikers, runners and perfect for a family day out.

To be transparent here, there are a number of reservoirs. I am unsure of just how many and have only visited three times. With this being said, I can’t be too precise, therefore. I will only speak of the locations I visited. I still have a lot yet to discover here.

Main reservoir and surrounding areas

Down at the bottom is the main reservoir and plenty of beauty spots to have a picnic. If you don’t fancy walking around these spots alone, make it a worthwhile visit.

The main reservoir

Yeoman Hey Reservoir

Yeoman Hey Reservoir circular walk is a steady, level, nice walk that is great for people of all ages, and anyone with a wheelchair or pram. The route offers scenic views of several reservoirs and stunning landscapes.

Just beyond Yeoman Hey there are parts that are a little rugged and a slightly inclined surface. However, the path remains.

You’ll start to come to some stunning overlooking views, as if you have had quite a hike when you really haven’t.

More advanced route for hikers

Chew Valley and Reservoir

Chew Valley can be reached through Dovestone Reservoir Car Park, walking by Dovestone Reservoir and the adjacent woodland, then taking the path route to the right. The climb will start from here.

The climb up is quite a challenging one, but the foot path makes it more manageable.

You will truly feel at one with nature surrounded by all the mountain landscapes.

Just before the reservoir, you will reach Chew Valley and its incredible beauty.

Chew Valley reservoir is one of the most beautiful and peaceful places. The reservoir is in an elevated position and sits 1,600 feet above sea level with views of the moorlands and hills.

Useful information

Getting here

I will use Manchester City centre as the starting point

By Car: It’s around a 45 to 50 minute drive depending on traffic. There are two car parks which pay and display and cost £4 for the day. As with many places, you will have to arrive early to get a place. Other than this, there are plenty of street parking in the surrounding areas.

By Bus: Get the train to Greenfield Station, than the 350 bus from Greenfield Station to Dovestones. This route will take just over one hour and 30 minutes.

Another option is to take a bus, either the 84 or the 83 from Oldham Street in Piccadilly. Take the bus to Oldham Town Centre, then take the 350 bus to Dovestones. This journey will take around two hours (buy a day saver for £5.50).

Facilities

There are toilets here including a disability toilet (RADAR key required)

There are no shops here, although there is usually an Ice cream van located in the Dovestone car park.

There is also a sailing club

I hope you have enjoyed my blog today.

Thank you for visiting today

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤

Manchester: A new love for an old place

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Nowdays I often think of how incredibly fortunate I am to be from one of the best cities here in the UK. But, I must admit I have not always felt this way. Instead, its been a kind of love hate relationship thing. Loving the place for all my connections such as family and friends, but hating how incredibly tired and bored I had become of it, truly believing the next cities were much better.

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It wasn’t until Covid came along that I found this new revitalised love for my city.

As challenging as covid has been it has left many of us with silver linings such as teaching us to love harder, to be kind, to appreciate and have gratitude for all we have been taking for granted. Reconnecting with my city has been one of my many silver linings.

Coming up on Nattytravels…

As part of my new reconnected love and appreciation for Manchester, it will now have a well deserved spot on my blog. The blogs will consist of places I have been to revist and new discoveries in the city.

Also in the next up and coming months I’m excited to announce I will be starting to travel abroad again after three very long years 🙌🏾. So you’ll be seeing more blogs on places abroad.

For all those who have been enjoying the UK blogs, I will still be continuing to travel the UK, therefore there will be plenty more👍🏾.

Thank you for all your support

And on this note I would like to take the opportunity to thank you all for your continued support here at Nattytravels, regardless of all the incorrect typo’s 🤣.

I really do appreciate it.

Thank you ❤🙏🏾

Manchester,England: The world’s first industrial city, and more interesting facts

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Hi all! Welcome back to my blog. I hope you have all had a wonderful weekend.

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In this blog, I would like to introduce Manchester, my home city. Have any of you ever visited? If so, what did you think? Be sure to leave your comments.

Location

Manchester is one of UK’s most popular cities. It is located in the north West of England and is the fifth largest city in the UK.

Here are a few of my favourite facts about Manchester

The World’s First Industrial City

It was the world’s first industrial city which led the way to transforming people’s lives in the area and across the world.

Due to it’s astounding growth of the cotton industry in the early 19th century it became a major global centre for trading and manufacturing. Textiles was the driving force, but it soon emerged to producing all kinds of products.

Manchester’s Symbol ‘The Worker Bee’

The Bee was adopted from the period when the city first became the global centre and leader in the Industrial Revolution. At the time it had been described as being like a hive for activity due to it’s hard working population, this was the motif behind it. Since this time, the Bee symbol has been the feature of the city and you’ll be sure to spot several symbols in and around the city .

Britain’s first ever black professor worked at Manchester University

Manchester University

Sir W. Arthur Lewis became Britain’s first ever black professor at aged 33, he was a Saint Lucian economist who come to work at Manchester University in 1948. Not only was he a professor, but a Noble prizewinner who was able to persuade and negotiate with world leaders.

He helped post- war Afro-Caribbean people arriving and settling in the areas of Hulme and Moss Side by creating centres of support for them. These centres supported people for socialising and learning at the height of racism and prejudice views. One of the centres still exists today in the moss side area. Sir Arthur wasn’t a Mancunian born, but he will be forever in the heart of manchester for his work and courage, and is commemorated at Manchester University with a building named after him.

The Suffragette Movement was founded here

Emmeline Prankhurst founded the Women’s Social and Political Union, known as the Suffragettes Movement in 1903. Emmeline a local Women from Manchester and her members fought to enfranchise women here in the UK, using militant strategies. In 1918 women were given limited rights to vote, and full voting rights in 1928 just before the passing of Emmeline Pankhurst.

One of the first cities in the world to celebrate and commemorate LGBT

Manchester was one of the first cities in the world to commemorate LGBT people by commissioning a local artist to paint the city with rainbow tiles in to flagstones across the city. Manchester Pride is one of the UK’ s leading charities celebrating LGBT and helping individuals to thrive as well as fighting for equality. It has held one of the worlds leading pride festivals since 1985 every year which is centred around the vibrant gay village.

The place where Charles Rolls and Henry Royce first ever met

It was at Manchester’s Midland Hotel where Rolls and Royce first met, and just two years later the pair formed the Rolls Royce company. There is a statue at the hotel dedicated to this meeting.

Hope you enjoyed my blog today. Which was your favourite fact? Do you have a favourite you know of that is not listed here?

I appreciate your visit today

Have a fantastic week

Stay blessed 🙏🏾❤