Manchester: Fletcher Moss Park and Parsonage gardens

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Hello to everybody!

I hope that everyone is off to a good start in the new year.

On the second day of the year, I spent a day in the Fletcher Moss botanical gardens to kick off my new year.

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Since it was a Sunday service on public transportation and there were more train strikes, I chose to go there because it seemed like a good choice that was not too far from home.

This prompts me to remark that, except for enjoying and living in the present, I haven’t set goals for this year. Aside from that, I want to start driving again this year because strikes and cancellations on public transportation have been making it difficult for me to get to some places. Do you have any new goals for this year? 

Fletcher Moss Parsonage and Gardens

Fletcher Moss Parsonage and Gardens is located in Didsbury, Manchester, and is one of the city’s best-lived green spaces.

Fletcher Moss Park was named after Fletcher Moss, an alderman who gifted his house, known as the parsonage, along with its gardens to the city of Manchester Council but continued to live there until his death in 1919.

The Parsonage is the second-oldest building in Didsbury, dating from around 1650. The house was used by the city council for many years but has since become a community centre with the help of lottery funding.

What to see here

There are separate areas here to see that are all linked in with the same park, so as well as the parsonage and gardens, there is also the Fletcher Moss Park and botanical garden, the nature reserve of Stenner Woods, Millgate Fields, and the River Mersey.

The botanical garden

The botanical garden is a gorgeous, tranquil sanctuary that is changeable with the weather, but no matter what time of the year you visit, it is always beautiful with so many beautiful plants. rock features and mini waterfalls palm trees, and a floating pond.

I’ve been here twice now, once in the spring and once in the winter, and both times were equally beautiful.

Stenner Woods and nature reserve

The wooded area isn’t particularly large, but it is a perfect place to get lost in nature. There are wetlands here, but there is also a wooden boardwalk to avoid getting your feet wet. There are also fallen trees that have been left there deliberately by the wardens, which just add to the natural environment. I couldn’t help but think how adventurous this would be for children as I walked around. I also saw little love hearts with pictures on them; I think these had been part of the Christmas trail, which I really enjoyed spotting.

There are a variety of species of birds that flock here all through the year; these include wrens, robins, blackbirds, thrushes, treecreepers, Sand Martins, blackcaps, and many more.

Millgate fields and River Mersey

There are also the millgate fields and the River Mersey, which make for a nice scenic walk along with other areas such as Withington, Charlton, and Northernden.

So if your in Manchester and fancy getting any from the city for a little while, I’d say this would be a great choice, and what’s more is that this place is right next to Didsbury Village, which is lined with numerous shops, cafes, and restaurants, which is perfect for grabbing a coffee or a bite to eat after your visit to Fletcher Moss Park.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today.

Thanks for visiting 

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Manchester: Manchester Cathedral

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I can’t quite believe I’ve never visited Manchester Cathedral before, given the number of times I’ve walked past this building and never even given it a thought to even take a look inside. Isn’t it ironic how little attention we pay to things and places that have always existed in our own cities or towns?

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Manchester Cathedral is in the heart of the city and has been one of its main attractions for more than 600 years. There was a new calling for a new collegiate church to be built, so in 1421 it was Henry V who signed a royal charter for permission for the rebuild, and then in 1847 a new Manchester diocese was created and this church became a cathedral.

One day, as I went for a walk around the city, I decided to visit the inside of Manchester Cathedral.

I was surprised as I entered because I hadn’t quite imagined it would be as big as it was from the outside. It’s actually a really beautiful cathedral, and the interior is a great example of mediaeval carved woodwork in the North of England; the stained glass is more modern as the church suffered damage in World War II. It also had more renovations after it was damaged in the 1996 IRA bombing.

It’s a great place for anyone who enjoys architecture and would like to learn more history about our vibrant little city.

Unfortunately, I didn’t take many photos as my battery was running low. Maybe I’ll visit again and post a few more.

If your visiting Manchester City Centre, do take a look inside. You can find the cathedral at Victoria St., Manchester M3 1SX.

Thanks for stopping by to take a look at our cities’ little cathedral. Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Dunham Massey

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My trip to Dunham Massey was my first national trust trip since becoming a member. I visited here at the beginning of autumn in October. If there was ever a perfect autumn day, this would have closely matched it for me.

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What is Dunham Massey and where is it?

Dunham Massey is a Georgian house, garden and an ancient deer park full of treasures and stories. It is situated in Altrincham, Cheshire, Greater Manchester, and is regarded as one of the best attractions in this region for history and nature lovers.

A bit about the history

The house was home to two historic families, the Booth’s and the Grey’s, and holds over 400 years of history, wealth, and some rather scandalous stories.

The present house was built in 1616 by Sir George Booth but has since been altered and remodelled over the years 1732, 1740, 1905, and 1908.

The rising of the estate

The house really rose after George Booth, the 2nd Earl of Warrington, inherited the Dunham estate from his father, Henry Booth, the 1st Earl of Warrington, along with a debt of £50,000. As a way to clear the debt, he planted hundreds of trees as a source of timber. However, he finally manages to pay off that debt when he marries Mary Oldbury, who came with a huge dowry of £24,000, which is around £2.5 million today.

The house was inherited by their only child, Mary Booth, who married Harry Grey, the 4th Earl of Stamford, which meant the Durham Estate was brought into the Earldom of Stamford and into the Grey family.

The estate stays in the Grey family until 1976, when the last Earl, the 10th Earl of Stamford Roger Grey, who inherited the estate at just 13 years old dies, leaving the estate to the National Trust. It is the biggest gift left to the National Trust to date.

Fake memories, an eerie spooky walk, and reindeer spotting.

I was absolutely certain I’d been here once before, on a school trip at around the age of seven. I remember the trip clearly as a day, but strangely, upon arrival and all throughout the day, there was absolutely nothing recognisable. I am still unsure if I have been here before. Perhaps it could be another one of my fake childhood memories. Nonetheless, the first thing I planned to do was visit the medieval deer park, which was first mentioned in 1362.

The park is of scientific interest as it has hundreds of ancient trees and there have been roaming deer here for almost 1000 years.

Walking through the spooky deer park

The more I moved into the park, which appeared to be more like an extremely eerie forest, the spookier it became, especially when I arrived at a creepy looking small house. I’m glad I was unaware at the time because this house is reportedly haunted. Nonetheless, I still stopped for photos, as you can see.

There wasn’t a single soul around. It gave me the impression that I was staring in a scary movie as the stupid one who goes walking alone. 

Although I actually wanted to turn around at this point, I was determined to see the deer, so I kept on going.

Finally, I spotted a herd of deer in the distance. I wanted to take a closer look because, believe it or not, I’ve never actually seen a deer, at least not up close. But as I got closer, they seemed to have all vanished. Then, all of a sudden, I turned around, and there was this huge male Buck staring at me. Then I saw a huge herd of them, and from this point on, they all seemed to appear out of nowhere.

I was so delighted to see them, especially since I was told there was a possibility I wouldn’t due to the weather.

 

With c. 3000 acres of land here, there is plenty of ground to walk on and lots of outside buildings to discover.

Dunham Massey Watermill

The mill is a 17th-century corn mill that was later transformed into a saw mill in 1860. Sadly, after technology evolved and the mill became more expensive to run, it stopped working in the 1930s. It was later given to the National Trust in 1950.

There are tours available here to learn more about the mill and its history, but I didn’t attend these.

The historic stables

The stables at Dunham Massey were completed in the 18th century and have remained completely unchanged.

They were built to house around 25 animals, including race goats, ponies, cows, and carriages.

I had such a blissful time exploring the grounds that I hadn’t noticed that almost two and a half hours had passed by and I’d still not been to the main house.

I visited inside the house,but unfortunately unable to share photos

I eventually go inside the main house, but unfortunately, I cannot share any pictures because, although visitors are allowed to take photographs with no flash, they are not permitted to be shared inside some of the National Trust properties.

What it was like inside the house

I can tell you that this is a great house to visit. It takes you right back in time, and you can almost feel the atmosphere and the stories as you walk around.

I found it to be quite an eerie place, although that could have had something to do with my visiting on a quiet Tuesday morning and being in most of the rooms alone. Of course, there was staff on every floor, but obviously not in every room.

In some sections of the house, like the servants’ quarters, there are staff members dressed in traditional clothing like what the staff would have worn back in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. I particularly liked the butler; he was really funny and filled my head with imagination by telling me stories of how the house was run.

Overall, it was a really lovely experience, and every member of staff here is super friendly and helpful.

If you would like more information about Dunham Massey, visit here.

I hope you enjoyed the blog today.

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

 

Morecambe Bay: My favourite hangout place of 2022

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This year, Morecambe Bay has been my favourite beach and hangout spot.

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As you may know, I live in a busy city, so I often opt to find a new quiet spot every year, somewhere not too far away from home where I can make regular trips in addition to my other travel adventures. A place I can relax and take some time to replenish my thoughts while getting some fresh air. This year, Morecambe Bay has been that place for me.

Where is Morecambe Bay?

Morecambe Bay is located just to the south of the Lake District National Park in the Northwest of England.

A bit about the history

Morecambe Bay is a large estuary with the longest stretch of mudflats in the UK.

Morecambe was founded when the Little North Western railway line was forced from Leeds and Bradford to a new seashore. This new shore had formed around the village of Poulton-le-sands, which later became Morecambe Bay.

The railway brought in goods and passengers who were going further afield up north, but this new seashore soon started to attract passerbys, which then saw the growth of entertainment, accommodation and other businesses throughout the nineteenth century.

It has the most incredible sunsets and beautiful backdrop

It is an area of scientific interest because of its location, its natural beauty, and the fact that it is home to lots of wildlife.

It also has some of the most amazing sunsets because of its location. I can honestly say I have witnessed the most incredible sunset I have ever seen right here, and I have seen plenty of sunsets. It’s magical!

In addition, it also boasts the most stunning mountains in the Lake District as a backdrop, which is another reason I’ve loved going here and taking long walks down the lovely promenade.

What a nice surprise!

Normally, when I come here, I walk around the promenade and stop when I find a comfortable spot to sit, but the last time I came, I made the decision to do things a little differently.

I continued walking until I reached the end of the promenade, at which point I turned and climbed some stairs to a charming cafe that overlooked the beach. I then turned right and entered a lovely neighbourhood with a small church. Since then, I’ve learned that this region is known as Heysham.

St Peter’s Church

The little picturesque church is called St. Peters Church. It is a 14th century church with parts dating right back to 800AD and sits right at the top of the cliffside.

The views from the chapel were really breathtaking. As I took it all in, I recall thinking how lovely a surprise it all was.

There was also another little surprise too, Glebe Garden, which is right next to the church. Unfortunately, I didn’t take any pictures of this, but it was a lovely, colourful garden with an oasis of peace and a calming atmosphere.

Thanks for stopping by today

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

I became a National Trust member

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*Please note this is not an advertisement blog and I am not being paid to post this; I just think it’s something that could be of some value to some readers.*

Last month I decided to join the National Trust and I’m super excited about it!

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What is the National Trust?

I’m sure many of you already know, but for those that don’t, the National Trust is Europe’s biggest conservation charity, which looks after over 500 heritage sites across England, Wales, and Northern Ireland as well as coastlines, the countryside, and green spaces so that people and nature can thrive  and this is done mostly through the help of people’s donations through memberships.

What’s in it for the members?

As a member, I now have access to over 500 heritage sites where I will be able to present my card and get free admission as well as free parking to the sites. Of course, it’s not entirely free because you have to pay for the membership card to begin with, but it is a fantastic investment for plenty of fun and adventures for a fraction of the price I would pay as a non-member.

Overseas and non UK citizens

Not only this, my membership also gives me access to similar sites across the globe because The International National Trust and similar organisations are all in partnership.

The membership is also offered to people in the US, but otherwise non-UK citizens can purchase a touring pass ( prices below)

Membership prices

Memberships last for one year, and there are different types of memberships that can be paid for either as a one-time payment or monthly payments. Although it is worth paying for one all at once, you will receive a £15 National Trust gift voucher. Here are the prices:

Membership Prices

Individual – £76.80 a year/ £6.40 a month

Young person – (18 to 25) £38.40 a year

junior – (5 to 17) £10 a year

Joint – (2 adults) £127.20 a year/ £10.60 a month

Family – ( 2 adults and all children) £133.80 a year/ £11.15 a month

Family – ( 1 adult and all children) £83.40 a year/ £6.95 a month

Touring pass for non UK citizens

Individual ( £37 for a 7 day pass or £43 for a 14 day pass)

Two people (£65 for a 7 day pass or £77 for a 14 day pass)

Family pass ( £71 for a 7 day pass or £91 for a 14 day pass)

See here for more information on the touring pass.

Already seeing the benefits of this little membership card

I bought the individual one because I usually travel alone, and I’ve already realised how valuable it is to have a membership. I recently took my first day trip using my card and would have had to pay a £10 admission fee if it weren’t for having the membership. My next planned day trip would have cost me a £19 admission fee, so it’s definitely worth it for people who like to take day trips.

For more information about the National Trust and its sites visit here.

I hope you have enjoyed my blog today

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Hollingworth Lake County Park

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Hollingworth Lake is situated in Littleborough, Greater Manchester, England.

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A bit about the history of Hollingworth Lake

The lake was first constructed to serve as the primary water source for Rochdale Canal, but in the 1860s it turned into a well- liked tourist destination.

Early in the 20th century, it started to lose popularity as a tourist attraction and was used as a training camp for the second World War.

Following World War II, Rochdale Council acquired the reservoir and boating rights and designated the surrounding areas as a country park in 1974, giving rise to the name Hollingworth Lake and Country Park, which is now a popular tourist destination once again.

I can’t believe I didn’t visit this location until earlier this year. It is one of the most beautiful places to grab a moment’s peace and quiet and another great find on the outskirts of my city.

I’d say this is a great place for those living or staying in Manchester seeking tranquility, and it’s only a 40-minute drive away from the city centre

Additional information

There are plenty of facilities here, including its very own caravan park. Take a look here to find out more and make the most of your day trip here.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Bangor: The oldest city in Wales

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Earlier this year, 2002, in May, I travelled to Bangor. I went there with some big expectations because it’s the oldest city in Wales. You’d think that I would have a tonne to tell you, but I’m sorry I don’t since, in all honesty, I wasn’t all that impressed on this trip and I couldn’t get to some of the places I wanted to visit.

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It was a little run-down

It looked pretty dingy and run-down, at least in the city centre, and there were lots of boarded-up shops, which is really sad for a once-thriving city.

Since I just visited the centre and not too far outside of it, I can only report on those areas. Given that I was only there for a single day, there may be far more to it and several locations to find that I am unaware of. Please don’t misunderstand me; I’m sure there are many that genuinely enjoy Bangor, but I suppose it depends on individual tastes. But nonetheless, I did find some beauty spots.

Things start to look up

I remember Googling the location to see what places and things I could visit around the city centre or within walking distance of the center; normally, I take buses and venture out, but I didn’t want to do that; I wanted a fairly relaxed day without having to rely on public transportation, and though there weren’t many recommendations near the city center, I decided the things recommended would suffice.

As a traveler, I have an important rule I go by, and it is that no matter where I go, regardless, I must make the most of the adventure and look for all the positives of a place. So I started to seek out some of those recommendations I had found within walking distance.

Garth Pier

Garth Pier is a listed structure and the second-longest pier in Wales, ninth overall in the British Isles. It is just a short 14-minute walk from the centre of Bangor.

There was a 50p charge to entire and no time  retrictions at least when I went.

The pier and its surrounding area were beautiful.

After a walk down the pier, I walked around the cute residential area and found this little spot of beach down an alleyway and ate my lunch here; if I had known this part of the day would be the best highlight of my day, I would have stayed a little longer, but the curious Annie in me wanted to get going with zeal to see what else was on offer.

Port Penrhyn Harbour

Port Penrhyn Harbour was once a major exporter of slate from Penrhyn Quarry, which was once the world’s largest slate quarry.

There wasn’t that much to do here, but it was nice to walk around and enjoy the views of the mountains in the distance.

Lon Las Ogwen

Now this is the most disappointing part of my trip because I was really looking forward to visiting Lon Las Ogwen and the pictures looked absolutely breathtaking.

I couldn’t find this place for some reason and ended up here with no idea where I was, but it definitely wasn’t Lon Las Ogwen.

I had Google Maps on to help me find this place, but it kept leading to a set of gates that were closed, and then to a restricted residential area that I couldn’t get access to. So it ended up just sitting here. It was so quiet. I was here for almost 40 minutes, and I didn’t see a single person, just birds. It was actually quite blissful, but it was a little chilly. I couldn’t help but think how beautiful this little spot would be on a day when the tide was in.

As I wasn’t successful in finding this place, you may want to take a look here to discover more.

Besides the above-mentioned, I didn’t really do much else besides browsing in some shops and purchasing a new jumper before heading back to the train station.

Other recommended places I didn’t get to visit

Penrhyn Castle

I wanted to visit Penrhyn Castle, but unfortunately for me, on the day I went, the castle was closed and was only open over the weekends, although now it is back to its normal opening hours. The castle and its gardens look so beautiful, and I’m looking forward to visiting one day in the near future.

Menai Suspension Bridge

I also wanted to visit Menai Bridge; however, it was a 20-minute bus ride away or a 45-minute walk, and given my limited time, I wasn’t able to do so.

The Menai Suspension Bridge, which was built by Thomas Telford, is connected with the Britannia Bridge, built by Robert Stephenson, and connects Anglesey to mainland Gwynedd. It is a popular tourist attraction. The Swellies are located between the two bridges and are popular for their swirling whirlpools and ever-changing tide currents.

Overall thoughts

Overall, it wasn’t the best day trip. However, I would definitely go back to see the sites I missed I think had I gotten to visit these places, it would have added a lot more value to my trip. Nonetheless, it was good to get out and visit a new destination.

I also thought it was a little unfortunate that over the years, the oldest city in Wales has not received as much investment as other cities have, but I’m happy to learn that there are fresh plans and finances for a redevelopment. So I’m quite looking forward to seeing what will happen in the future in this city.

All in all I would definitely re- visit with a bit more organisation.

Hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thanks for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester: Portland Basin Museum

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Portland Basin Museum is located in a nineteenth-century warehouse in Ashton-under-Lyne in Greater Manchester near a beautiful canal side.

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I visited here with my mum in 2020, just before the first COVID-19 national lockdown for England, hence us wearing our face masks in the photos.

Since I’m blogging more about locations in and around my city, I recently discovered the images on my old phone and decided that this museum deserved a worthy spot for Manchester my blog.

Stepping back into the 1920s

The museum has exhibitions where you can experience what life was like back in the 1920s in Tameside.

The 1920s street

We had a great time exploring the street of the 1920s.

My mum, who educated me with her own knowledge and recollections, made the trip much more informative and enjoyable.

My mum, who is in her sixties, was able to tell me about several things that were still in use in the 1950s and 1960s. I loved hearing about all her memories and stories as she recalled them from each of the items.

It was lovely to see how her expression changed when she came across items that brought back her memories. She was wearing a mask, so I couldn’t see her face, but I could see that her eyes were sparkling.

Exploring the industrial heritage and farm

We had the opportunity to learn about the region’s historical industrial heritage and what it was like to work in the mines by hearing personal accounts from those who had done so.

Life on the farm

There is also a part where you may read in detail about the early days of the local farming. 

We thought this was very intriguing.

Additional information

There is much more to do and learn about here in addition to what has already been covered, but I want to make this post as brief as possible.

The portland basin Museum, in my opinion, is a great place for visitors of all ages and has a lot to offer.

Admission:

Admission is free and the museum it’s usual opening hours are 10am to 4pm accept on Monday when it is closed.

Click here to find out more information if you plan to visit.

Hope you have enjoyed my blog today

Thanks for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

Greater Manchester:The beautiful Dovestones

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You may recall that I wrote about Dovestone Reservoir earlier this year.

Since I didn’t have many pictures to offer in the other blog, I thought I’d share more pictures on how breathtakingly gorgeous this place is now that I’ve been on numerous occasions.

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I’m constantly in awe of this place because there are so many various circular pathways, and every time I come here, I discover something new.

One of the greatest attractions, the trinniacle (a stack of rock formations), has eluded me up until now; however, my sister and her husband recently found it, and my sister has promised to accompany me there, which I’m super excited about. Additionally, there are a few locations I have yet to visit that I have found on Instagram.

There are magical hidden waterfalls everywhere, and it’s like the gift that just keeps giving.

Also, I finally hiked right up to the top of Chew Valley. It was the first time on top, and I walked across the moorland there. The views of Dovestone Reservoir were stunning. 

If you want to learn more about the history of Dovestones, click here. Thinking about visiting? You can check out my last blog, where you can find details of how to get here.

I hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thank you for visiting

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️

I went skydiving!

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If you follow me on Instagram, you might have noticed that I recently skydived. I’m still in a state of disbelief! I never truly envisaged doing it. EVER!! So how did I end up doing one of the strangest things I’ve ever done?

Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, meaning, I get a commission if you decide to make a purchase through my links, at no cost to you. Please read my Disclosure page for more info

Why I went Skydiving

At a family memorial gathering last year, I chatted with a younger cousin, who was 20 years old at the time. We were talking about her turning 21 when I asked her what she planned to do to celebrate. She asked if I would go skydiving with her because no one else would and she wanted to go skydiving. I hesitated for a long time before responding with a positive yes.

I agreed because, in my 40s, I wanted to conquer fear and venture entirely outside of my comfort zone, and what a terrific way to begin! (Keep in mind that this is after a few brandies).

Oh no, what did I commit to? I thought as I woke up the next morning……I still had a few months to wrap my mind around it, despite me feeling like this. However, boy, did those months fly by so quickly. Before I knew it, it was August 2022, and the day had finally arrived for me to skydive.

On the day of my skydive

Surprisingly, neither of us was anxious, and we had laughed and talked the entire one and a half-hour ride journey to the centre.

We waited around for a few hours for the weather to improve, but even then, neither of us felt nervous. I thought for sure the nerves would start to kick in once we arrived, but nope, not at all.

Preparations for our skydive

We were the first two students summoned that morning to jump. We had already decided that I would be the first to take the leap, with special instructions from my young cousin that I wasn’t allowed to scream in case it deterred her from participating lol.

Our instructors first met us and took us to a building where we put on our jumpsuits and received instruction on our exit and landing positions.

I was somewhat familiar with it because we had already viewed a quick training video on it at the centre earlier that morning.

My instructor was a really nice, friendly guy. although I am going to call him P for privacy purposes. I was happy that my wish had come true because I had read many positive reviews about him and hoped that he would be my instructor. I was also quite happy to find that he had been a skydiver for 35 years. This was certainly great to hear, seeing as he was in charge of pulling the parachute.

After meeting my instructor, I was introduced to my photographer for the day, another nice and friendly gentleman. Again, I won’t use his name for privacy purposes. Following a brief interview, the filming and photographs began. It was like a “lights, camera, action” moment.

The moment of the big jump

There it was.There was nothing left to do but board the aircraft and prepare to exit. And to be honest, I was still astonished by how composed we both were. At this moment, neither of us felt anxious, but that was about to change- at least for me.

As we reach 11000ft P helps me put my goggles on whilst giving me some final suggestions and advice, and then shuffles us towards the door so that my legs are dangling out of the plane. I’m now a little nervous at this point, and I’m not sure if I want to do it now.

The photographer jumps, and as I watch him fall through the clouds, I find myself falling through the air with a deep stomach drop, gasping for air, panicked and nearly losing exit position. This is not fun.

P then gives me a comforting pat, releases my hands from the harness, and extends my arms so they are in the flying position. At first, I was a little hesitant, but after a few seconds, I stretched my hands out and believed in P; I felt like I was flying, and it was such a lovely experience, and then the parachute opened.

The journey with the parachute was extremely enjoyable, however I did experience some motion nausea. As a matter of fact, I felt queasy for at least two hours afterwards. Oh, and as I descended on the parachute, I had the worst ear pain I’ve ever had. I occasionally have ear discomfort, generally when I’m on a descending aeroplane, but never as bad as this.

Verdict: would I do it again?

I would absolutely do it again despite loathing the first few seconds of it, feeling queasy, and getting ear pain.

The best and most liberating thing I’ve ever done!!

The only thing I would change is the height; I would go for the 15000ft rather than the 11000ft because you get a 60 second free fall instead of just a 38 second free fall. I think I would have benefited more from this since I only started to really enjoy the last few seconds of the free fall.

Would you ever do a skydive or have you ever done one?

If you want to skydive in the UK I highly recommend Black Knights Parachute Centre . I also recommend booking a photographer, they capture every moment of my experience. I received a hundreds of amazing photos and three videos. (This is not a paid advertisement, I just highly recommend this company)

Hope you enjoyed my blog today

Thanks for reading

Stay blessed 🙏🏾

Natalie ❤️