Exporing Liverpool Part 2

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Hi guy’s! Sorry it’s taken me so long to post part 2. I’m not the most efficient with getting my posts up but I promise to do better.

Before I get started……

I would like to welcome all of the new blog followers. Welcome and thanks for coming over and showing the blog some love. Also, I would like to thank the rest of you guys who have been here supporting … Thank you for your continued support here at Nattytravels, it is well appreciated, I’m truly grateful. Thank you!!

Taking off from where I left off

If you didn’t read part 1, you may want to take a look as this carries on from where I left off.

Albert Dock

Albert Dock

We arrive at Royal Albert Dock…. Albert Dock is a construction of docks and warehouse buildings which opened in 1846 and is part of Liverpool’s waterfront World Heritage Site. It was used for the loading and unloading ships from the warehouse. The construction design of the building made it a popular storage for precious item cargoes such as sugar, brandy, cotton, silk and tobacco etc.

As well as dominating the worldwide trade in the 19th century, the docks was involved in a number of things like, events of WWll when the cargoes become the target of German bombers. The bombs hit the docks and warehouses throughout the day and night during the May Blitz in 1941, which left a considerable amount of harm. In addition to this, the building was awarded a grade1 listing post-war, in 1960 and 1966 or was being considered for being demolished, in 1976 it is issued with a conserve and protect, by 1981 it is completely abandoned but is included in the regeneration of Liverpool.

Today the iconic Royal Albert Docks is home to arts and music culture, galleries, museums, restaurants, bars and a floating pop up cinema and attracts visitors of worldwide visitors a year.

Mathew Street

The street is an iconic street in the middle of Liverpool city centre, widely known for the cavern club, where the Beatles performed several times in their early years. Unfortunately, I didn’t get to visit inside because it was closed.

This street is one of the most popular streets in the world to experience a little Beatles history. The street is filled with a number of other Beatles themed bars in-fact, everything is Beatles themed. It’s just a great, quirky street to walk down and enjoy.

I enjoyed seeing this wall of fame of The wall of fame bar and kitchen.

Wall of fame

Hangry and confused by Eleanor Rigby

We’re taken to the monument of Eleanor Rigby. Not going to lie, I had no idea who she was and what her connection was with Liverpool. Nonetheless, I stick around in anticipation, even though I’m starting to feel a little grumpy due to hunger. Here’s what I could make of what I was being told:

  • Eleanor Rigby is a woman or name which was believed to be an inspiration for one of the Beatles best selling songs.
  • Paul McCartney has denied this to be true, saying it is a frictional character he made up.
  • There is a gravestone in Liverpool bearing the name Eleanor Rigby, a women who died in her 40’s in 1939. The gravestone has become a tourist attraction as part of the Beatles memorabilia, even though this lady is not associated with the Beatles
  • someone purchased the deeds to the gravestone for thousands of pounds

Now I’m stood looking at her monument! Yes! She actually has a monument! I don’t know who the statue is of, but it’s her monument πŸ€” Now I’m hangry and confused! πŸ˜‚

I leave the tour here as it goes overtime and I had a table booked at Cosy Club, which is a lovely little place to stop by if your ever in Liverpool.

The World Museum

Whilst having lunch at the Cosy room, I searched for places to visit as many places were still closed due to the pandemic. I wanted to visit the Slavery Museum or the Tate Liverpool, but neither one of them was open. It was a choice between The Walker Art Gallery Or the World Museum I chose the World Museum. So glad I did.

Spread across five floors, this museum is huge keeping you intrigued for hours. It’s offers such an educational and fun experience with its exhibits that range from live bugs, human anthropology, natural history, dinosaurs to space. In addition to this, there’s also an aquarium and planetarium.

This is probably the most impressive museum’s I’ve visited to date. Although some exhibitions were closed, I could see everything they would usually have to offer. This is a fabulous place for a family day out, there’s something for everyone here. I loved the mummy room!

Real mummies 🀀

Time flies when your having fun. This place kept me entertained so much I had lost track of time and it was time for me to catch my coach home. But not without any dilemmas.

My Dilemma

Before I’d arrived at the world museum after recharging my phone earlier using my compact charger, my battery was now low. I didn’t want to film too much as I needed to use Google maps to direct me to the coach station because I don’t take in directions very well.

I come out the museum switched on Google maps within 2 minutes my phone was dead. ‘It doesn’t matter, I’ll find my way’ I thought to myself. Then I suddenly realized my tickets were on my phone. Also I didnt have my bank card, I’d been paying for things using Google pay, so I couldn’t even purchase another ticket.

With 10 minutes to go before my coach is due, I manage to find a shop and convince them to let me use their plug socket to charge my phone. Whilst here, I get chatting to the shop assistant, loose track of time then realise I have two minutes before the coach leaves.

I leave the shop turning google maps back on and embarrassingly run through the city centre. I turned the corner, see my coach and start shouting to the driver as he’s about to step on to the coach…I get there, go to show him my ticket on my phone and my battery dies. Good job he believed I had a ticket and kindly let me board the coach πŸ˜‚.

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